Horrorfest 2018 Makes Me Shudder: 10 Years of Viewing


Look, I know the last one was a bust. I blame work, laziness, whatever. However this time I have a new, better resource: Shudder. Also not going with a list again, just showing the ones I have seen so far. Plus this is the 10th year of me doing Horrorfest. Wow. So I plan on going all out this time.

1. Tourist Trap (1979, Crazy People)-https://wordpress.com/view/madman731.wordpress.com
2. Sleepaway Camp (1983, Slasher)-https://wordpress.com/view/madman731.wordpress.com
3. Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama (1988, Demonic)-https://wordpress.com/post/madman731.wordpress.com/8723
4. Daughters of Darkness (1971, Vampires)-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2018/09/29/horrorfest-2018-presents-daughters-of-darkness-1971-harry-kumel/
5. Basket Case (1982, Creature Feature)-https://wp.me/pRBID-2gT
6. The Meg (2018, Big Ass Shark)-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2018/10/03/horrorfest-2018-presents-the-meg-2018-jon-turteltaub/
7. The Void (2016, Weird As Hell)-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2018/10/04/horrorfest-2018-presents-the-void-2016-steven-kostanski-and-jeremy-gillespie/
8. The Addiction (1995, Vampires)-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2018/10/07/horrorfest-2018-presents-the-addiction-1995-abel-ferrara/
9. Bad Moon (1996, Werewolf)-https://madman731.wordpress.com/?p=8763
10. The House By The Cemetery (1981, Italian horror)

11. Don’t Go In The Woods (1981, Slasher)
12. Curtains (1983, Crazy People)
13. Magic (1978, DUMMIES ARE CREEPY)
14. Black Belly of the Tarantula (1971, Giallo)
15. Sleepaway Camp II: Unhappy Campers (1988, Angela)
16. Sleepaway Camp III: Teenage Wasteland (1989, Angela. Again)
17. Scream Blacula, Scream (1972, Blacula. Duh)
18. Split (2017, THE BEAST)
19. Burial Ground (1985, Zombies)
20. Tetsuo: The Iron Man (1989, METAL BECOMES FLESH)
21. Cannibal Holocaust (1980, Cannibals)
22. The Giant Spider Invasion (1975, Spiders. Duh)

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2018 Movie Viewing Log


At this point, I do these simply to recall everything I watch every year. The 100+ movie viewing streak is alive and well, for now anyways.

January:


1. Requiem For A Dream (2000, Aronofsky)-100, Netflix Instant Viewing
2. New Year’s Evil (1980, Alston)-75, YouTube
3. The Giant Gila Monster (1959, Kellogg)-5, Netflix Instant Viewing
4. Godzilla vs. Hedorah (1971, Banno)-81, DVD
5. Godzilla vs Gigan (1972, Fukuda)-65, DVD
6. The Post (2017, Speilberg)-96, Theater Viewing
7. The Protector (1985, Glickenhaus)-88, Public Libray Blu Ray
8. Crime Story (1993, Wong)-84, Public Library Blu Ray
9. Darkest Hour (2017, Wright)-87, Theater Viewing

Movie of the Month: Requiem For A Dream (2000, Aronofsky)-100, Netflix Instant Viewing

February:

10. Time Chasers (1994, David Giancola)-50, Netflix Instant Viewing
11. The King’s Speech (2010, Hooper)-83, DVD
12. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017, McDonagh)-97, Theater Viewing
13. The Shape of Water (2017, del Toro)-98, Theater Viewing
14. Call Me by Your Name (2017, Guadagnino)-98, Theater Viewing
15. Phantom Thread (2017, Anderson)-95, Theater Viewing

Movie of the Month: The Shape of Water (2017, Del Toro)-98, Theater Viewing

March:

16. The Florida Project (2017, Baker)-93, RedBox
17. Lady Bird (2017, Gerwig)-100, Theater Viewing
18. Sleeping With Other People (2015, Headland)-85, Netflix Instant Viewing
19. Black Panther (2018, Coogler)-94, Theater Viewing
20. Blood Feast (1963, Lewis)-80, Blu Ray
21. Vertigo (1958, Hitchcock)-100, First Time Theater Viewing
22. Hostiles (2017, Cooper)-84, Theater Viewing
23. Real Genius (1985, Coolidge)-93, DVD

Movie of the Month: Lady Bird (2017, Gerwig)-100, Theater Viewing

April:

24. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (2017, Kasdan)-86, Theater Viewing
25. A Quiet Place (2018, Krasinski)-95, Theater Viewing
26. Isle of Dogs (2018, Anderson)-96, Theater Viewing
27. Game Night (2018, Daley and Goldstein)-90, Theater Viewing
28. Heat (1995, Mann)-100, Netflix Instant Viewing

Movie of the Month: Heat (1995, Mann)-100, Netflix Instant Viewing

May:

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29. Avengers: Infinity War (2018, Russo Brothers)-95, Theater Viewing
30. Pump Up The Volume (1990, Moyle)-90, DVD
31. Deadpool 2 (2018, Leitch)-92, Theater Viewing
32. Shin Godzilla (2016, Anno and Higuchi)-88, Blu Ray
33. Porco Rosso (1992, Miyazaki)-95, First Time Theater Viewing
34. Guide Dog (2006, Plympton)-88, Theater Viewing
35. Day of Anger (1967, Valerii)-91, Blu Ray

Movie of the Month: Porco Rosso (1992, Miyazaki)-95, First Time Theater Viewing

June: 

36. RoboCop 3 (1993, Dekker)-68, Comet TV
37. Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018, Howard)-81, Theater Viewing
38. Dark City (1998, Proyas)-90, Blu Ray
39. The Rider (2017, Zhao)-100, Theater Viewing
40. Dead or Alive (1999, Miike)-97, Blu Ray
41. Breakfast At Tiffany’s (1961, Edwards)-95, Netflix Instant Viewing

Movie of the Month: The Rider (2017, Zhao)-100, Theater Viewing

July:

42. American Made (2017, Liman)-88, Public Library
43. Blade Runner 2049 (2017, Villeneuve)-90, Blu Ray
44. Sicario: Day of the Soldado (2018, Sollima)-98, Theater Viewing
45. Bao (2018, Shi)-83, Theater Viewing
46. Incredibles 2 (2018, Bird)-86, Theater Viewing
47. The Prowler (1981, Zito)-70, Shudder
48. Sorry To Bother You (2018, Riley)-98, Theater Viewing

Movie Of The Month: Sorry To Bother You (2018, Riley)-98, Theater Viewing

August:

49. Tourist Trap (1979, Schmoeller)-84, Shudder
50. Sleepaway Camp (1983, Hiltzik)-75, Shudder
51. Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama (1988, DeCoteau)-53, Shudder
52. Daughters Of Darkness (1971, Kümel)-82, Shudder
53. Mission: Impossible – Fallout (2018, McQuarrie)-95, Theater Viewing
54. Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018, Reed)-90, Theater Viewing
55. Basket Case (1982, Henenlotter)-79, Shudder
56. Jack Reacher: Never Go Back (2016, Zwick)-88, Hulu
57. The Meg (2018, Turteltaub)-80, Theater Viewing

Movie of the Month: Mission: Impossible – Fallout (2018, McQuarrie)-95, Theater Viewing

September:

58. I’m Gonna Git You Sucka (1988, Wayans)-84, Tubi TV
59. The Haunted World of El Superbeasto (2009, Zombie)-60, Tubi TV
60. The Void (2016, Gillespie and Kostanski)-83, Netflix Instant Viewing
61. Smokey and the Bandit (1977, Hal Needham)-90, Theater Viewing
62. A Simple Favor (2018, Feig)-91, Theater Viewing
63. The Addiction (1995, Ferrara)-92, Public Library
64. Killing Zoe (1994, Avary)-88, Tubi TV

Movie of the Month: The Addiction (1995, Ferrara)-92, Public Library

October:

65. Bad Moon (1996, Red)-70, Tubi TV
66. House by the Cemetery (1981, Fulci)-93, Shudder
67. Don’t Go In The Woods (1981, Bryan)-30, Shudder
68. Curtains (1983, Ciupka)-70, FilmRise TV
69. Magic (1978, Attenborough)-91, Shudder
70. Sleepaway Camp II: Unhappy Campers (1988, Simpson), Tubi TV

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Horrorfest 2018 Presents: Bad Moon (1996, Eric Red)


Despite having the look and feel of a TV movie Bad Moon is a decent werewolf movie with some good special effects. The cast helps: Mariel Hemingway, Michael Paré and Mason Gamble elevate some paper thin material. The film is mostly simple, yet its a dog that is the best thing about Bad Moon. Thor is a huge, protective German Shepherd that seems to be the only one who knows what is going on. I guess its hard to realize someone you love is a werewolf.

I did like the discussion on if werewolves need a full moon to change, and the wolf attacks are brutal. The last act has plenty of suspense and Bad Moon has its moments. Still I can see why some did not like this film, and I wonder if a werewolf movie with a large budget will happen any time soon.

Horrorfest 2018 Presents: The Addiction (1995, Abel Ferrara)


Getting bitten by a vampire can really turn your life upside down, as Lili Taylor finds out in The Addiction. While Abel Ferrara obviously focuses on drug addiction (two scenes involve needles) yet the film’s strongest aspect is it channeling of different philosphy views. Taylor’s Kathleen Conklin is a philosphy student, after all, and so The Addiction also focuses on her using her beliefs and thoughts while dealing with the effects of becoming a vampire. All shot in stark black and white, a throwback to the old days of horror, a choice that gives the film an eeire, almost dreamlike quality. I wondered how much the slightly better, also great Only Lovers Left Alive was inspired by The Addiction. They would make for a radical double bill.

Especially since both focus mostly on the problems of being a vampire, while not being all that creepy or scary. Life does not stop when you are undead, as Kathleen and the others she infects find out. Also being addicted to blood, like any other drug, causes major problems. The scenes with Christopher Walken are interesting, since Walken is a vampire able to control his habbit, a functioning addict. He urges her to read Naked Lunch, and then I recall that I have yet to read my copy, and I should. I have luckily avoided drugs, although I do enjoy beer more often than I should.

At times The Addiction felt smarter than it actually is, so maybe it reflects philosphy students in that regard. I related more to Kathleen’s friend and fellow student Jean, played by a pre-The Sopranos Edie Falco, who worries about Kathleen all too late and fails to run for the hills when its really apparent something is wrong with her. Still this is a unique and fascinating take on the vampire curse, and I prefer it to some of the other vampire movies I have seen over the years. Plus it spotlights 1990s New York City, a city I am not sure I will ever get to visit. For now cinema gets me close enough.

Horrorfest 2018 Presents: The Void (2016, Steven Kostanski and Jeremy Gillespie)


Equal parts John Carpenter, David Cronenberg and HP Lovecraft, The Void is a homage to 1980s films while also standing firmly on its own. There are gory freaky moments, some great shots, and a good sense of pacing. However the plot is a bit thin and there is some acting that is bad even for a horror film. I do think my viewing would have been slightly improved had I been able to see The Void on the big screen, as it adds something to not only horror films but most films in general. Netflix just is not the same, despite their good selection and picture quality.

The main setting is at a hospital that is poorly staffed due to a fire that destroyed part of the building. The hero, Dan, swears a lot and has demons that drive some of his intensity. It does not help matters that a group of weirdos are outside, or that unknown terrors lie in the basement. I like that The Void uses practical effects, and there are moments that are freaky and surprising. If you cannot stomach gore and strange monsters this film is not for you.

I wonder if the film’s creators are planning a sequel, based on how this film ended. I also really liked the film’s score, even if it was John Carpenter lite. My favorite thing about The Void was how it explored some of the characters, diving into their connections with each other. It elevated some of the material, and causes one shockingly violent scene to have a tragic meaning in addition to a shocking one. Good pick by Netflix, and a good fall movie, too.

Horrorfest 2018 Presents: The Meg (2018, Jon Turteltaub)


Sometimes you just want to enjoy a big dumb action comedy horror film that has Jason Statham battling a giant prehistoric shark. He even has help from a wide cast of people ranging from Li Bingbing to Robert Taylor. Rainn Wilson is along for the ride as the comic relief, and The Meg actually has a fairly diverse cast. Also the creature effects are pretty good despite being mostly CGI, and I did love the underwater scenes. Besides how can you hate a movie that has Statham singing “Just keep swimming” while dealing with a huge shark? It never hurts to turn your brain off sometimes, although this film is more clever than some critics think.

Besides there are a few good jump scare moments, and the film is smart enough to have a good pace and run time. While this should have been an R rated gore fest, The Meg has enough to keep most entertained. Also the little girl who plays Bingbing’s daughter is beyond adorable, and is the highlight of the film. The ocean is full of terrors, so they say, and even wonders. As long as mankind never awakens something hidding in the deep.

Horrorfest 2018 Presents: Basket Case (1982, Frank Henenlotter)


Ah low budget 80s cinema showcasing a New York City I never got to experience. Basket Case is a wacky, gory and odd flick, one of those geek show movies you experience if you enjoy cult films. I happen to be one of those people, so I liked the trashy feel of this movie. After all, Basket Case features a man who keeps his deformed twin in a wicker basket, hence the title. The man goes and seeks revenge on those who seperated him from his freak brother, a monster that only he is able to communicate with.

I give Frank Henenlotter credit for making a horror movie that never comes off as too silly, as he knows when to dial in the camp factor. There are also some freaky scenes, particularly the death of a woman that has a good jump scare. I like the practical effects, too, as the creature puppet is wonderfully disgusting, and its an aspect of horror that I miss in this age of CGI. Kevin Van Hentenryck really shines in this film as the lead, and while the film is not more than an 80s creature feature its still a solid, entertaining movie regardless.

Horrorfest 2018 Presents: Daughters of Darkness (1971, Harry Kümel)


Daughters of Darkness is one of those slow burnining, atmospheric erotic films where there is a horror plot, yet its just an excuse to feature nudity and blood. This is a Belgian vampire film with hardly any vampire moments, yet I still liked it, much as I also liked Jean Rollin’s The Shiver of the Vampires. Both movies have plenty of style, yet I prefer Kümel’s film more: it has better acting and even better pacing. I also can see where the possible inspiration for The Hunger (1983) came from, a film that is superior to the ones I have mentioned. Sometimes the student becomes the master, a common theme in many horror films.

A couple seemingly in love journey to a haunting and stunning hotel in the middle of nowhere. There is a gorgeous older woman who does not age, and talk of brutal murders. Things come to a head eventually, but not before we get eerie moments and a scene that is one of the film’s most interesting. Sure this film is the typical style over substance and maybe I liked it more than I should have. Vampire movies can be added to my list of horror subgenres I seem to adore, despite their obvious flaws.

Horrorfest 2018 Presents: Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama (1988, David DeCoteau)


How to discuss a movie called Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama? I am literally shaking my head as I write a review for a film that I only saw because of Joe Bob Briggs. This is what I get for being a fan. Poor Linnea Quigley (from Davenport, Iowa! Neat!) agreed to make this gutter ball of a film (using turkey would imply something good) after rising to fame in Return of the Living Dead, a much better film in every way. Regardless a movie that doesn’t even really live up to its title has a few charms, and this flick was not a total waste. Andras Jones is actually likable as the film’s goofy hero, and Quigley gets some cool moments. If only the film’s villain was not Uncle Impie, and yes if that reminds people of a drunken uncle who gets busted for multiple crimes then it should. Uncle Impie is one of the worst horror villains of all time, and he lives up to his awful name in every way. Oh and this film was made in 12 days, and it really shows. If you want to be a filmmaker, this movie should be an inspiration to you to follow your dream: I doubt you can make a movie any less outrageous than this one.

The plot…is really not important. A bunch of idiots end up locked in a mall with Quigley and Uncle Impie, who they unleash and then fail to realize that he is an evil creature that causes mischief. At least the film has a reason they can’t leave: the mall is locked by doors that Impie electrifies. If we are going by reasonable film standards I cannot recommended this film, and even if we are going by horror movie standards the same applies. Yet I was not bored at all, and I did enjoy some of the kills. Also having a girl turn into the Bride of Frankenstein was kind of amusing. In the hands of a better director this could have been more than a curiosity, a type of “Geek show” to somewhat quote the late great Roger Ebert.

Horrorfest 2018 Presents: Sleepaway Camp (1983, Robert Hiltzik)


Ah the 1980s, a time full of goofy slasher flicks like Sleepaway Camp. Made at the height of the horror movie craze Robert Hiltzik’s movie reflects the typical 80s horror movie: low budget, full of mostly unknowns, featuring plenty of horrible deaths and some cheesy music. The end credits features something called “Angela’s Theme” and it oddly fits a movie where the unseen killer stalks their victims. Too bad I already knew who the killer was, having been spoiled already thanks to years of being online and the fact that this movie came out decades ago. Oh to have been in the theater for this one and seen the reactions; I had to settle instead for Joe Bob Briggs’ commentary and a viewing on Shudder, neither of which are bad yet getting to see this on the big screen would be a treat. I am not sure if this is a good movie, however I enjoyed it at its basic level, and that is all that matters.

The plot is fairly simple: kids go to a camp, some of them meet horrible ends. It all revolves around quiet yet eerie Angela and her cousin Ricky, who is very protective of her. Sent to camp by Aunt Martha (Desiree Gould in what is the strangest performance I have ever seen) they are at the center of a murder mystery. Naturally the film tries to hide who the killer is, and there were times when even though I knew who it was I wondered if maybe it was two people. After all there is the interesting fan theory that has Rickey helping the killer the whole time, which all things considered makes a lot of sense. I wish I could discuss the disturbing twist ending more, yet its one of those “You have to see it for yourself” moments in horror cinema. I have not viewed any of the sequels, although I sort of wish to just because its amusing that Sleepaway Camp actually had sequels. It’s an odd duck, the kind of movie after watching you ponder before moving onto something actually more interesting.

Horrorfest 2018 Presents: Tourist Trap (1979, David Schmoeller)


Create a horror movie with killer puppets, Chuck Connors, and Tanya Roberts and I am going to watch it. I love 1970s horror for being out there, unafraid to try its hardest to scare the viewer. While Tourist Trap is merely creepy, it also has plenty of entertainment value and also one of those endings you think about for days. Bravo to Shudder for having this movie and for Joe Bob Briggs adding the witty and informative comedy. Also based on what I have seen of his work David Schmoeller is an underrated horror craftsman who made some good flicks that I have enjoyed. This is one of them.

A group of young folks make that classic horror movie error of stumbling onto an abandoned museum. Is this place in the middle of nowhere and run by western acting legend Chuck Connors? Absolutely. I also like that I was unable to guess the Final Girl, which makes Tourist Trap in that unique small group of slasher films. I love the weird kills, Connor stealing the movie, the young likable cast, the amazing ending, and how goofy this film is at times. I imagine this flick has a high replay value, and that everyone should watch it at least once.

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