Horrorfest 2018/It’s Hammer Time Presents: The Curse of the Werewolf (1961, Terence Fisher)


Oliver Reed appeared in many Hammer Films over the years, and The Curse of the Werewolf, the third film I viewed on Halloween, was one of his towering performances. Reed goes from being sympathetic and likable to a horrifying beast, giving us, the audience, reason to root for and also be repulsed by him. As typical of many Hammer productions this one touches upon class issues, and of course features a prior evil that leads to the main evil, a plot element that many slasher films incorporated later on as well. Also I had no idea that a child born on Christmas Day would become a werewolf, something that I have never heard of before in any horror movie that I can think of, although perhaps it is based in some old myth or legend. It is too bad that Hammer Studios only made one werewolf movie, as this is one of their best films and it was made by their premier director, Terence Fisher.

Catherine Feller is also great as Cristina, who Reed’s Leon falls in love with despite the fact she comes from wealth and he is unable to marry her, and Martin Matthews is likable as Leon’s friend, Jose. I really dug the werewolf transformations, and the creature effects are properly freaky for such a film. Featuring a well rounded cast, surprising amounts of gore for a 1960s movie, and anchored by Reed’s excellent performance, The Curse of the Werewolf is a must for both horror and Hammer fans.

2018 Movie Viewing Log


At this point, I do these simply to recall everything I watch every year. The 100+ movie viewing streak is alive and well, for now anyways.

Top 10 of the Year-

1. Heat (1995, Mann)
2. Requiem For A Dream (2000, Aronofsky)
3. Lady Bird (2017, Gerwig)
4. The Rider (2017, Zhao)
5. Tetsuo: The Iron Man (1989)
6. Sorry To Bother You (2018, Riley)
7. The Shape of Water (2017, del Toro)
8. Call Me by Your Name (2017, Guadagnino)
9. Sicario: Day of the Soldado (2018, Sollima)
10. Mandy (2018, Cosmatos)

January:

1. Requiem For A Dream (2000, Aronofsky)-100, Netflix Instant Viewing
2. New Year’s Evil (1980, Alston)-75, YouTube
3. The Giant Gila Monster (1959, Kellogg)-5, Netflix Instant Viewing
4. Godzilla vs. Hedorah (1971, Banno)-81, DVD
5. Godzilla vs Gigan (1972, Fukuda)-65, DVD
6. The Post (2017, Speilberg)-96, Theater Viewing
7. The Protector (1985, Glickenhaus)-88, Public Libray Blu Ray
8. Crime Story (1993, Wong)-84, Public Library Blu Ray
9. Darkest Hour (2017, Wright)-87, Theater Viewing

Movie of the Month: Requiem For A Dream (2000, Aronofsky)-100, Netflix Instant Viewing

February:

10. Time Chasers (1994, David Giancola)-50, Netflix Instant Viewing
11. The King’s Speech (2010, Hooper)-83, DVD
12. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017, McDonagh)-97, Theater Viewing
13. The Shape of Water (2017, del Toro)-98, Theater Viewing
14. Call Me by Your Name (2017, Guadagnino)-98, Theater Viewing
15. Phantom Thread (2017, Anderson)-95, Theater Viewing

Movie of the Month: The Shape of Water (2017, Del Toro)-98, Theater Viewing

March:

16. The Florida Project (2017, Baker)-93, RedBox
17. Lady Bird (2017, Gerwig)-100, Theater Viewing
18. Sleeping With Other People (2015, Headland)-85, Netflix Instant Viewing
19. Black Panther (2018, Coogler)-94, Theater Viewing
20. Blood Feast (1963, Lewis)-80, Blu Ray
21. Vertigo (1958, Hitchcock)-100, First Time Theater Viewing
22. Hostiles (2017, Cooper)-84, Theater Viewing
23. Real Genius (1985, Coolidge)-93, DVD

Movie of the Month: Lady Bird (2017, Gerwig)-100, Theater Viewing

April:

24. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (2017, Kasdan)-86, Theater Viewing
25. A Quiet Place (2018, Krasinski)-95, Theater Viewing
26. Isle of Dogs (2018, Anderson)-96, Theater Viewing
27. Game Night (2018, Daley and Goldstein)-90, Theater Viewing
28. Heat (1995, Mann)-100, Netflix Instant Viewing

Movie of the Month: Heat (1995, Mann)-100, Netflix Instant Viewing

May:

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29. Avengers: Infinity War (2018, Russo Brothers)-95, Theater Viewing
30. Pump Up The Volume (1990, Moyle)-90, DVD
31. Deadpool 2 (2018, Leitch)-92, Theater Viewing
32. Shin Godzilla (2016, Anno and Higuchi)-88, Blu Ray
33. Porco Rosso (1992, Miyazaki)-95, First Time Theater Viewing
34. Guide Dog (2006, Plympton)-88, Theater Viewing
35. Day of Anger (1967, Valerii)-91, Blu Ray

Movie of the Month: Porco Rosso (1992, Miyazaki)-95, First Time Theater Viewing

June:

36. RoboCop 3 (1993, Dekker)-68, Comet TV
37. Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018, Howard)-81, Theater Viewing
38. Dark City (1998, Proyas)-90, Blu Ray
39. The Rider (2017, Zhao)-100, Theater Viewing
40. Dead or Alive (1999, Miike)-97, Blu Ray
41. Breakfast At Tiffany’s (1961, Edwards)-95, Netflix Instant Viewing

Movie of the Month: The Rider (2017, Zhao)-100, Theater Viewing

July:

42. American Made (2017, Liman)-88, Public Library
43. Blade Runner 2049 (2017, Villeneuve)-90, Blu Ray
44. Sicario: Day of the Soldado (2018, Sollima)-98, Theater Viewing
45. Bao (2018, Shi)-83, Theater Viewing
46. Incredibles 2 (2018, Bird)-86, Theater Viewing
47. The Prowler (1981, Zito)-70, Shudder
48. Sorry To Bother You (2018, Riley)-98, Theater Viewing

Movie Of The Month: Sorry To Bother You (2018, Riley)-98, Theater Viewing

August:

49. Tourist Trap (1979, Schmoeller)-84, Shudder
50. Sleepaway Camp (1983, Hiltzik)-75, Shudder
51. Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama (1988, DeCoteau)-53, Shudder
52. Daughters Of Darkness (1971, Kümel)-82, Shudder
53. Mission: Impossible – Fallout (2018, McQuarrie)-95, Theater Viewing
54. Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018, Reed)-90, Theater Viewing
55. Basket Case (1982, Henenlotter)-79, Shudder
56. Jack Reacher: Never Go Back (2016, Zwick)-88, Hulu
57. The Meg (2018, Turteltaub)-80, Theater Viewing

Movie of the Month: Mission: Impossible – Fallout (2018, McQuarrie)-95, Theater Viewing

September:

58. I’m Gonna Git You Sucka (1988, Wayans)-84, Tubi TV
59. The Haunted World of El Superbeasto (2009, Zombie)-60, Tubi TV
60. The Void (2016, Gillespie and Kostanski)-83, Netflix Instant Viewing
61. Smokey and the Bandit (1977, Hal Needham)-90, Theater Viewing
62. A Simple Favor (2018, Feig)-91, Theater Viewing
63. The Addiction (1995, Ferrara)-92, Public Library
64. Killing Zoe (1994, Avary)-88, Tubi TV

Movie of the Month: The Addiction (1995, Ferrara)-92, Public Library

October:

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65. Bad Moon (1996, Red)-70, Tubi TV
66. House by the Cemetery (1981, Fulci)-93, Shudder
67. Don’t Go In The Woods (1981, Bryan)-30, Shudder
68. Curtains (1983, Ciupka)-70, FilmRise TV
69. Magic (1978, Attenborough)-91, Shudder
70. Black Belly of the Tarantula (1971, Cavara)-81, Shudder
71. Sleepaway Camp II: Unhappy Campers (1988, Simpson), Tubi TV
72. Smokey and the Bandit (1977, Needham)-90, Theater Viewing
73. Sleepaway Camp III: Teenage Wasteland (1989, Simpson)-45, Tubi TV
74. Scream Blacula Scream (1973, Kelljan)-70, Tubi TV
75. Split (2017, Shyamalan)-88, Public Library
76. Burial Ground: The Nights of Terror (1981, Bianchi)
77. Tetsuo: The Iron Man (1989, Tsukamoto )-100, Shudder
78. Cannibal Holocaust (1980, Deodato)-90, Shudder
79. The Giant Spider Invasion (1975, Rebane)-31, Tubi TV
80. Teenage Zombies (1959, Warren)-22, Tubi TV
81. Dracula (1973, Curtis)-80, Shuddder
82. Creepshow 2 (1987, Gornick)-85, Shudder
83. Death Bed: The Bed That Eats (1977,Barry)-35, Shudder
84. Zombie Holocaust (1980, Girolami)-90, Shudder
85. The Gate (1987, Takács)-82, Shudder TV
86. Chopping Mall (1986, Wynorski)-80, Tubi TV
87. Halloween (2018, Green)-87, Theater Viewing
88. Hell of the Living Dead (1980, Mattei)-60, Shudder
89. The Bat (1959, Wilbur)-75, Tubi TV
90. Phantasm III: Lord of the Dead (1994, Coscarelli)-75, Shudder
91. Contamination (1980, Cozzi)-80, Shudder
92. We Always Find Ourselves in the Sea (2017, Hogan)-83, Shudder
93. Madman (1982, Giannone )-87, Tubi TV
94. Willow Creek (2014, Goldthwait)-81, Shudder
95. Ghostwatch (1992, Manning)-92, Shudder
96. The New York Ripper (1982, Fulci)-87, DVD
97. The Deadly Spawn (1983, Douglas McKeown)-66, DVD
98. The Curse of the Werewolf (1961, Fisher)-90, Blu Ray
99. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986, Hooper)-83, Blu Ray

Movie of the Month: Tetsuo: The Iron Man (1989)-100, Shudder

November:

Image result for Overlord (2018)

100. The Wraith (1986, Marvin)-84, Shudder
101. WolfCop (2014, Dean)-77, Shudder
102. Bohemian Rhapsody (2018, Singer)-87, Theater Viewing
103. Overlord (2018, Avery)-92, Theater Viewing
104. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs (2018, Coen Brothers)-80, Netflix

Movie of the Month: Overlord (2018, Avery)-92, Theater Viewing

December:

20181203_032317

105. Mandy (2018, Cosmatos)-98, Shudder
106. Maniac (1980, Lustig)-80, Shudder
107. Christmas Evil (1980, Jackson)-88, Shudder
108. Christmas Vacation (1989, Chechik)-87, Theater Viewing
109. Blue Sunshine (1977, Lieberman)-90, Shudder
110. Phantasm IV: Oblivion (1998, Coscarelli)-83, Shudder
111. Phantasm: Ravager (2016, Hartman)-63, Shudder
112. Amsterdamned (1988, Maas)-80, Shudder
113. The Christmas Chronicles (2018, Kaytis)-82, Netflix
114. Liquid Sky (1982, Tsukerman)-95, Shudder
115. The Last Dragon (1985, Schultz)-83, Netflix Instant Viewing
116. Revenge (2018, Fargeat)-93, Shudder

Movie of the Month: Mandy (2018, Cosmatos)-98, Shudder

It’s Hammer Time Presents: The Phantom of the Opera (1962, Terence Fisher)


Unlike its predecessors, Terence Fisher’s The Phantom of the Opera (1962) is more of a modern style take on the original 1925 classic, which starred Lon Chaney. In this remake Herbert Lom tackles the role, and gives it style, grace, and a tragic flare that was missing from the original film. In fact despite not being as good as the 1925 version one thing I like about the 1962 adaption is that it is more in tune with the book. The Phantom was not a monster at first, but in the end was turned into one because of circumstance-in this case, it is because the Phantom was robbed of his works by an arrogant and selfish individual, leading to him turning into a horribly disfigured man. Also I was a bit reminded of the 2004 musical, especially since there are actually musical numbers in this movie and much of the film is as much a drama as it is a horror movie.

The cast is pretty good here-Hammer Studios regular Michael Gough is wonderfully evil and sinister, Edward de Souza plays a solid and likable hero, and Heather Sears is rather good while doing the thankless job of being the pretty damsel who ends up the object of the Phantom’s desire. Much like Fisher’s other Hammer films the visuals here are stunning, and the set designs are remarkable. Even though it lacks the 1925 version’s high level of creepiness, and Lom unfortunately doesn’t measure up to Lon Chaney’s brilliant and freaky Phantom, who he completely made his own, this is a rather solid remake. Some of Hammer Studio’s most notable efforts included non-franchise movies such as this one, and its a shame that this movie failed at the box office. At least its developed a cult following since.

It’s Hammer Time Presents: The Man Who Could Cheat Death (1959, Terence Fisher)


Operating as another one of the studios famous mad scientist movies, The Man Who Could Cheat Death has some of Terence Fisher’s usually strong visual style of film making that is the reason why he is the best out of the studios’ stable of directors at the height of its popularity. This film is well made and also is a tad creepy, as the title character turns out to be a monster as a result of his desire to live forever. Georges Bonnet is arrogant, intelligent, murderous and yet utterly charming. Without the parathyroid glands he takes from his victims Georges will finally die after living for over a 100 years. His mentor, Prof. Ludwig Weiss, refuses to help and therefore Georges has to force Pierre Gerard to perform the operation that will enable Georges to continue living forever. A scene that shows what happens to Georges’ victims is rather eerie, aimed at being terrifying and featuring plenty of green. Its almost as if Georges was an alien instead of just a man who thanks to science has found the secret of eternal life. This gift is of course not without a steep price.

Its a bit strange seeing Christopher Lee in a non-monster/evil person role, and he does a fine job here as Pierre, the doctor who unless he aids Georges will suffer the loss of the woman the two men love, Janine Dubois (played by the lovely and talented Hazel Court).  Anton Diffring is fantastic as Georges, giving life to a man who has become evil in his quest to never die. His fate becomes sealed by different forces, and the finale is rather violent and intense, as are most endings to Hammer Studios movies. This film is rather good also for its discussion on what long life, especially possibly living forever, can do to a person. In a key scene Ludwig and Georges argue about the surgery, with Ludwig mentioning that the years have changed Georges for the worse, not for the better. It almost reminds me of some newer Doctor Who episodes where the Doctor’s companions tell him to never travel alone, and how the Doctor often reflects that living so long has turned him into a different man completely.

Some argue that this movie is too heavy on dialogue, yet I like how Fisher sets up his more dramatic elements. Plus the killings are properly horrific and there is plenty of suspense in the final act. I do want to view the original version of this film, titled The Man In Half Moon Street and compare the two films. Hammer Studios was usually quite good at making remarkably entertaining remakes that either channeled the spirits of the originals or offered a new twist on previous material.

It’s Hammer Time Presents: The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958, Terence Fisher)


I’m not quite sure how this film’s title makes any sense, although perhaps Frankenstein achieves revenge by living, I guess? Cleverly escaping being executed for his horrible crimes and for creating a monster that killed people in the first installment, the good Baron takes up a new practice in England. The local doctors are jealous of his talents, so Frankenstein must plan ahead and try to remain a step up above the usual people hounding him, and of course the authorities too. Hans, a long doctor (played by Francis Matthews) figures out who the Baron is and forces him to become his mentor. I actually like Peter Cushing best in this installment, as he expertly goes from being kind to his typical madman, a doctor who treats the poor but is also using them as parts for his experiments. What Frankenstein achieves this time is taking a hunchback, Karl-who helped Frankenstein escape-and transform him into a normal man by transplanting his brain. The experiment is a success, and yet the new Karl (Michael Gwynn) refuses to go along with the main plan, with disastrous consequences.

What surprised me is that this film is equal to the first installment, and that Fisher manages to equal his previous grand achievement, giving birth to a sequel that is one of the best sequels ever made in my opinion. Revenge is creepy, thrilling, and rather dark, as poor Karl becomes a tragic figure damned by man and by the Baron, cheated out of a happy life. In a way he is even more pitiful than the famous creature that Christopher Lee and Boris Karloff previously embodied, for he is a normal looking man and yet due to circumstances beyond his control his life is ruined. The Baron never looks back or shows remorse, and this is aptly showcased in The Revenge of Frankenstein.

How the film ends I will not reveal, but I will say that with this installment Frankenstein becomes something akin to a slasher villain: its not possible to defeat him, even with the authorities in hot pursuit. The final shot is rather chilling, and this film has all the grace marks of a good Fisher Hammer Studios movie. So far I have not viewed any other movies that come close to matching Revenge or Curse of Frankenstein, and I doubt I will. They have style and elegance, proper intelligence and excellent pacing.

It’s Hammer Time Presents: The Evil of Frankenstein (1964, Freddie Francis)


Although building on the previous entries in the series, The Evil of Frankenstein is in many ways a stand alone movie. It also feels a bit like a remake since Universal Studios finally gave Hammer Studios the rights to their Frankenstein franchise. Which is why the monster in this film resembles the famous version from the James Whale films. By this point the Baron is in desperate need of funds so he returns home with his assistant Hans in tow, to seek out his home and use what lies within to enable him to continue his research.

While I dug the opening sequence and I found the evil hypnotist, Zoltan, to be a good aspect of the film I was mostly left disappointed. Francis clearly has talent but he isn’t given much to work with here. This entry fails to offer anything new and is saved from being completely dull by Peter Cushing, who by this point was able to play Frankenstein in his sleep. However this is not a bad film, and I liked the ending. It’s just that compared to the other Hammer Frankenstein movies its a pale imitation. I’m not even sure Terence Fisher could have saved this film.

Favorite Horror Movies


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  1. Night of the Living Dead (1968, George A. Romero)
  2. Gremlins (1984, Joe Dante)
  3. Videodrome (1983, David Cronenberg)
  4. Halloween (1978, John Carpenter)
  5. Night of the Creeps (1986, Fred Dekker)
  6. The Last Man On Earth (1964, Ubaldo Ragona, Sidney Salkow)
  7. The Horror Express (1973, Eugenio Martin)
  8. Shaun of the Dead (2004, Edgar Wright)
  9. Carnival of Souls (1960, Herk Harvey)
  10. Alien (1979, Ridley Scott)
  11. Evil Dead II: Dead By Dawn (1987, Sam Rami)
  12. Scream (1996, Wes Craven)
  13. Tremors (1990, Ron Underwood)
  14. Re-Animator (1985, Stuart Gordon)
  15. Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter (1984, Joseph Zito)
  16. Horror of Dracula (1958, Terence Fisher)
  17. Sleepy Hollow (1999, Tim Burton)
  18. Trick ‘r’ Treat (2008, Michael  Dougherty)
  19. The Frighteners (1996, Peter Jackson)
  20. Arachnophobia (1990, Frank Marshall)

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It’s Hammer Time Presents: Frankenstein Created Woman (1967, Terence Fisher)


One of the best things about Peter Cushing is how no matter what the movie he appeared in he always gave his all to whatever role he played. The part of Baron Frankenstein suited him rather well, and in Frankenstein Created Woman the Baron is working with an older assistant named Dr Hertz, attempting to isolate the soul of a person. In doing so he will conquer death via a new means, so long as he is able to captain a person’s soul and essence. Finally the brilliant madman is able to achieve his goal without interference from others, yet human nature becomes his new problem.

Like many of the entries in this series there is a ghoulish and cruel opener. A man is the executed, and the repercussions of this action happen years later when his son is framed for murder by a trio of upper class thugs. His beloved, Christina (the lovely and talented Susan Denberg) kills herself in response after seeing her lover brutally executed, and Frankenstein realizes this his chance to prove his metaphysical theories. Of course this leads to that classic scene featuring strange machines at work, resulting in weird science happening.

Frankenstein Created Woman is a film with two halves: one a science fiction Gothic horror tale with tragedy, the other a slasher film. The Baron does create a monster that is beautiful and lovely, and yet due to having the soul of a vengeful man it proceeds to go on a rampage. Unfortunately for Baron Frankenstein and his assistant the authorities of the village come after him per the typical realization that he is responsible, and events come to a head. Particularly after the Baron and Dr Hertz realize what is actually happening.

Despite at times being cheesy and a little slow in the middle, Frankenstein Created Woman is one of the better sequels in the Frankenstein series. The conclusion is both sad and haunting, and this film is rather entertaining and intelligently made. I continue to enjoy viewing these movies, as its amusing to me how Frankenstein continues to survive and work despite everyone being against him.

It’s Hammer Time Presents: The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959, Terence Fisher)


Look Peter Cushing is great as Sherlock Holmes and this adaptation is true to the book. Having Christopher Lee staring with him in a non Frankenstein or Dracula movie is a bit amusing and cool. Yet this film was too dry and not interesting enough, despite a good opener that sets up the film’s atmosphere. Also André Morell who plays Watson is rather dull, not properly serving as a foil to Sherlock. Considering that other actors have better embodied Watson its a bit disappointing, although I fault the writing in this film for not properly utilizing him. I suppose after the BBC Sherlock and the 1980s Adventures of Sherlock Holmes not to mention even the Guy Ritchie Holmes films I expect more from Watson. Then again though the original source material didn’t have him being this dull, either.

There is one thing I always like about Hammer Studios films though and that is how they often insert subtitle thoughts about class. Most of their films were set in the late 1800s, yet the fact that often it was lower or middle class people against rich upper class villains is an interesting contrast. Although I admit that many of the heroes were of high standing, too.

Still not all the movie is a complete waste, as its still entertaining and watchable despite its flaws. I liked the mine scene because its suspenseful and interesting. Too bad that Hounds is not more than an okay take on a classic novel. Especially with Fisher, Lee and Cushing involved; however this does not change the fact that Fisher was the most talented director out of all the ones who worked for Hammer Studios, and he was responsible for many of their best works. Also I will admit this is not really a horror movie at all, even though there are a number of scenes that come straight out of the best of Hammer Studios style Gothic horror.

It’s Hammer Time


I couldn’t resist, as cheesy as that title is. Anyways I set out last year to watch as many Hammer Studios movies as I could, and although I’m really behind schedule I’ve still viewed some since last Horrorfest. Links to reviews will be posted here, and I would like to note that I have already seen some Hammer Studios movies prior. I would like to dedicate this entire project to the studio itself, and I’m glad that they are following me on Twitter, which is cool. Also since Netflix sends me whatever DVD they have ready on hand some of these viewings will be out of order.
The List, So Far:

1. X: The Unknown (1956, Leslie Norman), Netflix-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2014/03/30/its-hammer-time-x-the-unknown-1956-leslie-norman/
2. The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959, Terence Fisher), Netflix-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2014/04/01/its-hammer-time-presents-the-hound-of-the-baskervilles-1959-terence-fisher/
3. The Plague of the Zombies (1966, John Gilling), Netflix-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2014/04/07/its-hammer-time-presents-plague-of-the-zombies-1966-john-gilling/
4. Frankenstein Created Woman (1967, Terrence Fisher), Netflix-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2014/04/12/its-hammer-time-presents-frankenstein-created-woman-1967-terence-fisher/
5. The Abominable Snowman (1957, Val Guest), Netflix-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2014/04/27/its-hammer-time-presents-the-adominable-snowman-1957-val-guest/
6. Night Creatures (1962, Peter Graham Scott), Netflix-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2014/05/16/its-hammer-time-presents-night-creatures-1962-peter-graham-scott/
7. The Evil of Frankenstein (1964, Freddie Francis), Netflix-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2014/05/16/its-hammer-time-presents-the-evil-of-frankenstein-1964-freddie-francis/
8. The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958, Terence Fisher), Netflix-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2014/05/29/its-hammer-time-presents-the-revenge-of-frankenstein-1958-terence-fisher/
9. The Stranglers of Bombay (1959, Terence Fisher)-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2014/06/17/its-hammer-time-presents-the-stranglers-of-bombay-1959-terence-fisher/
10. The Terror of the Tongs (1961, Anthony Bushnell)-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2014/06/23/its-hammer-time-presents-the-terror-of-the-tongs-1961-anthony-bushnell/
11. The Man Who Could Cheat Death (1959, Terence Fisher)-https://madman731.wordpress.com/2014/07/22/its-hammer-time-presents-the-man-who-could-cheat-death-1959-terence-fisher/
12. The Phantom of the Opera (1962, Terence Fisher)
13. Paranoiac (1963, Freddie Francis)
14. The Snorkel (1958, Guy Green)
15. The Maniac (1963, Michael Carreras)
16. The Curse of The Mummy’s Tomb (1964, Michael Carreras)
17. The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll (1960, Terence Fisher)
18. The Reptile (1966, John Gilling)
19. The Witches (1966, Cyril Frankel)
20. The Mummy’s Shroud (1967, John Gilling)
21. Dracula Has Risen From The Grave (1968, Freddie Francis)
22. Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (1969, Terence Fisher)
23. Taste The Blood of Dracula (1970, Peter Sasdy)
24. Blood From The Mummy’s Tomb (1971, Seth Holt)
25. Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972, Alan Gibson)
26. The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires (1974, Roy Ward Baker)
27. Frankenstein and the Monster From Hell (1974, Terence Fisher)
28. The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1974, Alan Gibson)
Previously Viewed:

1. The Curse of Frankenstein (1957, Terence Fisher)
2. The Horror of Dracula (1958, Terence Fisher)
3. The Mummy (1959, Terence Fisher)
4. The Brides of Dracula (1960, Terence Fisher)
5. The Gorgon (1964, Terence Fisher)
6. The Devil Rides Out (1968, Terence Fisher)
7. Captain Kronos: Vampire Hunter (1974, Brian Clemens)

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