Horrorfest 2021 Presents: Habit (1997, Larry Fessenden)


Habit and The Addiction would make for a good indie movie 1990s vampire in NYC double bill. Habit is more indie movie than The Addiction though, and despite some rough edges it is a really good movie. This works as both a drama and a horror film, depicting a young man’s slide into alcoholism and entering into a corrosive relationship with a mystery young woman. Who may or may not be a vampire, which the movie does hint at midway through.

Sam is dealing with his father’s death and his girlfriend breaking up with him at the same time. He ends up going out with a mysterious woman Anna (Meredith Snaider), who could be evil. Or at least destructive, since she doesn’t curtail his drinking and she keeps bitting him. That’s not normal, is it? Only if you’re in denial I guess.

Even though this isn’t a great movie, Habit still is really good and definitely has it’s share of eerie moments. My favorite part is when Sam and his friend run out into the ocean, cold weather be damned! This movie has a lot of little moments that work and add to the film’s overall aesthetic. Larry Fessenden is actually a really good, natural actor for a director and Snaider gives off some fantastic eerie vibes as well. Sometimes when you meet a strange woman at a party, the wise thing to do is run the other way.

Horrorfest 2016 Presents: We Are Still Here (2015, Ted Geoghegan)


Barbara Crampton is the official actress of my Horrorfest. She’s been in a lot of famous and notable horror films, one of her latest being the creepy modern classic horror flick We Are Still Here. This film is one big wonderfully gory and frightening homage to 1980s horror films. I also love how this movie utilizes empty and quiet spaces, reminding the viewer how the mundane and the everyday can be truly unsettling.

Anne (Crampton) and Paul (Andrew Sensenig) are a grieving couple who lost their son in a car accident. Moving into an old New England house is supposed to aid then in grieving, yet instead it leaves them open to attack from dark forces beyond the grave. It’s interesting how this film also manages to move across different horror sub genres with ease.

Oh and that last act is truly something else. I didn’t expect this film to be so violent, and I was also amused by Larry Fessenden, one of the few directors to be a decent actor. We Are Still Here is tragic, comedic, terrifying and memorable. I’m a sucker for haunted house movies. This one is more than just that, in spades.

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