2018 Movie Viewing Log


At this point, I do these simply to recall everything I watch every year. The 100+ movie viewing streak is alive and well, for now anyways.

Top 10 of the Year-

1. Heat (1995, Mann)
2. Requiem For A Dream (2000, Aronofsky)
3. Lady Bird (2017, Gerwig)
4. The Rider (2017, Zhao)
5. Tetsuo: The Iron Man (1989)
6. Sorry To Bother You (2018, Riley)
7. The Shape of Water (2017, del Toro)
8. Call Me by Your Name (2017, Guadagnino)
9. Sicario: Day of the Soldado (2018, Sollima)
10. Mandy (2018, Cosmatos)

January:

1. Requiem For A Dream (2000, Aronofsky)-100, Netflix Instant Viewing
2. New Year’s Evil (1980, Alston)-75, YouTube
3. The Giant Gila Monster (1959, Kellogg)-5, Netflix Instant Viewing
4. Godzilla vs. Hedorah (1971, Banno)-81, DVD
5. Godzilla vs Gigan (1972, Fukuda)-65, DVD
6. The Post (2017, Speilberg)-96, Theater Viewing
7. The Protector (1985, Glickenhaus)-88, Public Libray Blu Ray
8. Crime Story (1993, Wong)-84, Public Library Blu Ray
9. Darkest Hour (2017, Wright)-87, Theater Viewing

Movie of the Month: Requiem For A Dream (2000, Aronofsky)-100, Netflix Instant Viewing

February:

10. Time Chasers (1994, David Giancola)-50, Netflix Instant Viewing
11. The King’s Speech (2010, Hooper)-83, DVD
12. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017, McDonagh)-97, Theater Viewing
13. The Shape of Water (2017, del Toro)-98, Theater Viewing
14. Call Me by Your Name (2017, Guadagnino)-98, Theater Viewing
15. Phantom Thread (2017, Anderson)-95, Theater Viewing

Movie of the Month: The Shape of Water (2017, Del Toro)-98, Theater Viewing

March:

16. The Florida Project (2017, Baker)-93, RedBox
17. Lady Bird (2017, Gerwig)-100, Theater Viewing
18. Sleeping With Other People (2015, Headland)-85, Netflix Instant Viewing
19. Black Panther (2018, Coogler)-94, Theater Viewing
20. Blood Feast (1963, Lewis)-80, Blu Ray
21. Vertigo (1958, Hitchcock)-100, First Time Theater Viewing
22. Hostiles (2017, Cooper)-84, Theater Viewing
23. Real Genius (1985, Coolidge)-93, DVD

Movie of the Month: Lady Bird (2017, Gerwig)-100, Theater Viewing

April:

24. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (2017, Kasdan)-86, Theater Viewing
25. A Quiet Place (2018, Krasinski)-95, Theater Viewing
26. Isle of Dogs (2018, Anderson)-96, Theater Viewing
27. Game Night (2018, Daley and Goldstein)-90, Theater Viewing
28. Heat (1995, Mann)-100, Netflix Instant Viewing

Movie of the Month: Heat (1995, Mann)-100, Netflix Instant Viewing

May:

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29. Avengers: Infinity War (2018, Russo Brothers)-95, Theater Viewing
30. Pump Up The Volume (1990, Moyle)-90, DVD
31. Deadpool 2 (2018, Leitch)-92, Theater Viewing
32. Shin Godzilla (2016, Anno and Higuchi)-88, Blu Ray
33. Porco Rosso (1992, Miyazaki)-95, First Time Theater Viewing
34. Guide Dog (2006, Plympton)-88, Theater Viewing
35. Day of Anger (1967, Valerii)-91, Blu Ray

Movie of the Month: Porco Rosso (1992, Miyazaki)-95, First Time Theater Viewing

June:

36. RoboCop 3 (1993, Dekker)-68, Comet TV
37. Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018, Howard)-81, Theater Viewing
38. Dark City (1998, Proyas)-90, Blu Ray
39. The Rider (2017, Zhao)-100, Theater Viewing
40. Dead or Alive (1999, Miike)-97, Blu Ray
41. Breakfast At Tiffany’s (1961, Edwards)-95, Netflix Instant Viewing

Movie of the Month: The Rider (2017, Zhao)-100, Theater Viewing

July:

42. American Made (2017, Liman)-88, Public Library
43. Blade Runner 2049 (2017, Villeneuve)-90, Blu Ray
44. Sicario: Day of the Soldado (2018, Sollima)-98, Theater Viewing
45. Bao (2018, Shi)-83, Theater Viewing
46. Incredibles 2 (2018, Bird)-86, Theater Viewing
47. The Prowler (1981, Zito)-70, Shudder
48. Sorry To Bother You (2018, Riley)-98, Theater Viewing

Movie Of The Month: Sorry To Bother You (2018, Riley)-98, Theater Viewing

August:

49. Tourist Trap (1979, Schmoeller)-84, Shudder
50. Sleepaway Camp (1983, Hiltzik)-75, Shudder
51. Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama (1988, DeCoteau)-53, Shudder
52. Daughters Of Darkness (1971, Kümel)-82, Shudder
53. Mission: Impossible – Fallout (2018, McQuarrie)-95, Theater Viewing
54. Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018, Reed)-90, Theater Viewing
55. Basket Case (1982, Henenlotter)-79, Shudder
56. Jack Reacher: Never Go Back (2016, Zwick)-88, Hulu
57. The Meg (2018, Turteltaub)-80, Theater Viewing

Movie of the Month: Mission: Impossible – Fallout (2018, McQuarrie)-95, Theater Viewing

September:

58. I’m Gonna Git You Sucka (1988, Wayans)-84, Tubi TV
59. The Haunted World of El Superbeasto (2009, Zombie)-60, Tubi TV
60. The Void (2016, Gillespie and Kostanski)-83, Netflix Instant Viewing
61. Smokey and the Bandit (1977, Hal Needham)-90, Theater Viewing
62. A Simple Favor (2018, Feig)-91, Theater Viewing
63. The Addiction (1995, Ferrara)-92, Public Library
64. Killing Zoe (1994, Avary)-88, Tubi TV

Movie of the Month: The Addiction (1995, Ferrara)-92, Public Library

October:

Image result for tetsuo the iron man

65. Bad Moon (1996, Red)-70, Tubi TV
66. House by the Cemetery (1981, Fulci)-93, Shudder
67. Don’t Go In The Woods (1981, Bryan)-30, Shudder
68. Curtains (1983, Ciupka)-70, FilmRise TV
69. Magic (1978, Attenborough)-91, Shudder
70. Black Belly of the Tarantula (1971, Cavara)-81, Shudder
71. Sleepaway Camp II: Unhappy Campers (1988, Simpson), Tubi TV
72. Smokey and the Bandit (1977, Needham)-90, Theater Viewing
73. Sleepaway Camp III: Teenage Wasteland (1989, Simpson)-45, Tubi TV
74. Scream Blacula Scream (1973, Kelljan)-70, Tubi TV
75. Split (2017, Shyamalan)-88, Public Library
76. Burial Ground: The Nights of Terror (1981, Bianchi)
77. Tetsuo: The Iron Man (1989, Tsukamoto )-100, Shudder
78. Cannibal Holocaust (1980, Deodato)-90, Shudder
79. The Giant Spider Invasion (1975, Rebane)-31, Tubi TV
80. Teenage Zombies (1959, Warren)-22, Tubi TV
81. Dracula (1973, Curtis)-80, Shuddder
82. Creepshow 2 (1987, Gornick)-85, Shudder
83. Death Bed: The Bed That Eats (1977,Barry)-35, Shudder
84. Zombie Holocaust (1980, Girolami)-90, Shudder
85. The Gate (1987, Takács)-82, Shudder TV
86. Chopping Mall (1986, Wynorski)-80, Tubi TV
87. Halloween (2018, Green)-87, Theater Viewing
88. Hell of the Living Dead (1980, Mattei)-60, Shudder
89. The Bat (1959, Wilbur)-75, Tubi TV
90. Phantasm III: Lord of the Dead (1994, Coscarelli)-75, Shudder
91. Contamination (1980, Cozzi)-80, Shudder
92. We Always Find Ourselves in the Sea (2017, Hogan)-83, Shudder
93. Madman (1982, Giannone )-87, Tubi TV
94. Willow Creek (2014, Goldthwait)-81, Shudder
95. Ghostwatch (1992, Manning)-92, Shudder
96. The New York Ripper (1982, Fulci)-87, DVD
97. The Deadly Spawn (1983, Douglas McKeown)-66, DVD
98. The Curse of the Werewolf (1961, Fisher)-90, Blu Ray
99. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986, Hooper)-83, Blu Ray

Movie of the Month: Tetsuo: The Iron Man (1989)-100, Shudder

November:

Image result for Overlord (2018)

100. The Wraith (1986, Marvin)-84, Shudder
101. WolfCop (2014, Dean)-77, Shudder
102. Bohemian Rhapsody (2018, Singer)-87, Theater Viewing
103. Overlord (2018, Avery)-92, Theater Viewing
104. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs (2018, Coen Brothers)-80, Netflix

Movie of the Month: Overlord (2018, Avery)-92, Theater Viewing

December:

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105. Mandy (2018, Cosmatos)-98, Shudder
106. Maniac (1980, Lustig)-80, Shudder
107. Christmas Evil (1980, Jackson)-88, Shudder
108. Christmas Vacation (1989, Chechik)-87, Theater Viewing
109. Blue Sunshine (1977, Lieberman)-90, Shudder
110. Phantasm IV: Oblivion (1998, Coscarelli)-83, Shudder
111. Phantasm: Ravager (2016, Hartman)-63, Shudder
112. Amsterdamned (1988, Maas)-80, Shudder
113. The Christmas Chronicles (2018, Kaytis)-82, Netflix
114. Liquid Sky (1982, Tsukerman)-95, Shudder
115. The Last Dragon (1985, Schultz)-83, Netflix Instant Viewing
116. Revenge (2018, Fargeat)-93, Shudder

Movie of the Month: Mandy (2018, Cosmatos)-98, Shudder

Darling (2015, Mickey Keating)


When a suspicious elder lady (hey look it’s Sean Young) tells me that the last person she hired met a bad end, it would be enough to make me run the other way. Darling (Lauren Ashley Carter), a young woman, is desperate enough for cash that she ignores the warning and agrees to house sit a freaky house in New York City. Without that you don’t have a movie that is creepy, eerie, and full of surprises. All shot in glorious black and white, and featuring some freaky hallucinatory moments that add to the film.

I also like how tightly paced and well made Darling is, which works to it’s advantage. The film is also divided up into chapters, and manages to pay homage to Roman Polakski’s classic horror films and The Shining. It has a lot in common with a few others but those influences, which the director Mickey Keating builds upon, shape the film while also feature Keating putting his own stamp on the horror genre. The visions are scary and I almost waited until daylight to finish this one. I’m always glad to find a hidden gem during my Horrorfests, and this is one such film.

Horrorfest 2016 Presents: Castle Freak (1995, Stuart Gordon)


How to know you’re in a horror movie: you have been blinded in a car accident, your parents are played by Jeffrey Combs and Barbara Crampton, and Combs’ haunted ex professor is moving the family into a huge Italian castle. This is Stuart Gordon’s Castle Freak, an exercise in slow burning fear that, although a bit too slow, is still creepy and entertaining.

I mean you have a movie where a deranged monster escapes and the family hangs around, because…why not? Sure later on they can’t leave but the minute I found out the castle had a rather serious issue I would be running far, far away. Yet when the blind daughter, played by Jessica Dollarhide, tells her parents someone is in the castle they dismiss her as hearing things. The fact that her parents are fighting only complicates things and adds to more problems later on.

One thing I like about Gordon’s work so far (I’ve seen his two other Lovecraft inspired films from the 80s) is that he embodies his movies with a sense of dread, plus gore. The creature effects here are nasty and brutal enough, and the last act is suspenseful. Despite its flaws Castle Freak is a solid entry in the “Don’t go in the house” type of movie, which by the 90s seemed to be on life support for some reason.

Horrorfest 2016 Presents: The Cars That Ate Paris (1974, Peter Weir)


This is a rather strange and yet intriguing movie. It is sci-fi, horror, and satire all rolled up into one cult low budget film package. Peter Weir before he hit it big in Hollywood created some interesting and unique movies that were centred in Australia or around Australians. The Cars That Ate Paris is one such film, and its title and subject is rather obvious. Well at least at face value.

Arthur is a young man who survives a car crash that kills his brother and leaves him stranded in the small town of Paris, Australia. He quickly discovers that no one leaves Paris, and also finds himself caught between the rebellious youth and the ruling elders of the town. This film despite weak acting and some questionable moments still is a bleak apocalyptic window into a society gone mad, ruined by their obsession with the auto.

The last act reminded me of Mad Max, which I’m sure was inspired by this movie. Weir has always been a director with something to say, and with Cars he delivers a good film that always kept me wathing. If one sits through the slower parts one is rewarded with a movie that has a crazy final act and even a funny scene out of a western. I would love to read the essay on this film written for its Criterion release.

Horrorfest 2016 Presents: Coma (1978, Michael Crichton)


Okay for a merely very good and entertaining horror thiller from the 197os this movie has a pretty awesome cast. Tom Selleck, Ed Harris and Rip Torn all appear in this film and they aren’t even the stars or major characters. Heading the film are Michael Douglas, Geneviève Bujold, and legendary actor Richard Widmark. Famous Bond girl Lois Chiles also makes an appearance as a woman who suffers misfortune, because well it’s a 70s horror thriller set in a hospital. Nothing good ever happens there.

Susan Wheeler and Mark Bellows (Douglas, Bujold) have trouble in their relationship. They also have trouble at the hospital they work at, Boston Memorial, where normal healthy people are falling into comas for no reason. Susan has her suspicions while Mark is convinced it’s nothing. Desperate, she confides in Dr. George Harris (Widmark), who tries to keep her out of trouble. Things spiral from there of course, and there are many tense and crazy scenes that are well crafted. I particularly loved a freaky moment in a clinic that is straight out of a David Cronenberg movie. Funny considering this was made during his early period, and I have to wonder if it helped inspire Dead Ringers. 

coma1978crichton

Furthermore the last act is a bit outlandish if not completely paranoid driven, and yet it works. The movie is largely an exercise in slow burn and the payoff is worth the film’s solid runtime. Douglas and Bujold have great chemistry together, and Crichton actually shows talent as a director. Maybe more writers should make movies, or perhaps just certain ones can direct. Also the film has some interesting commentary on sexual politics (Susan would probably be more easily believed if she was a man or not in the 1970s) and some thoughts on the medical profession.

Widmark’s monologue is fantastic and crazy, a sample of it being: “Our society faces momentous decisions. Decisions about the right to die. About abortion. About terminal illness, prolonged coma, transplantation. Decisions about life and death. But society isn’t deciding. Congress isn’t deciding. The courts aren’t deciding. Religion isn’t deciding. Why? Because society is leaving it up to us, the experts. The doctors.” I guess in all of the madness I forgot that this movie is very well written and has some quality dialogue. Nice.

Horrorfest 2015 Presents: Nightbreed (1990, Clive Barker)


A good way to tell if you are in a horror movie is that David Cronenberg is your psychologist. Plus you are having recurring nightmares of murders and a place that is not found on any map. If you also encounter a strange man who ends up carving off his own flesh and speaks of a mystical place known as Midian, the very place you have been searching for, well you are most likely in a horror movie. Clive Barker created a cult film in Nightbreed, a twisted yet oddly captivating and moving fantasy horror movie about a man’s search for a place to call home.

Boone is the name of that young man, troubled because he is being framed for crimes he has never committed. Midian happens to be something truly else, a community that is almost out of this world. Only Barker, the creator of so many gruesome and yet intriguing films and books could give birth to something as inspired and fascinating as this film. Lucky for me Netflix had the director’s cut which was released by Scream Factory, and thus I was able to witness Barker’s vision as intended. Studios never care about the artist and what they are trying to accomplish.

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Even after I saw this film I still was not sure what the creatures of Midian were, and I’m not sure if they were really good or not. Compared to a twisted mask wearing serial killer, rednecks and corrupt local law enforcement the beings of Midian are saints. Also its too bad that Craig Sheffer never became a big star, as he’s great in this movie as Boone. Matching him rather well is Anne Bobby as Lori Winston, his girlfriend, who does not understand what is going on with Boone and searches for him despite it clearly not being a good idea. Cronenberg manages to be rather creepy as Boone’s psychologist, Dr. Decker-although I cannot say more about what occurs-and he really should have been in more movies, as he is that rare director who can act.

I also liked how the film uses so many different creature effects, and of course Doug Bradley, who famously played Pinhead, makes an appearance in this movie. I also prefer the alternative ending, which is the one that is used for the Netflix copy of this film since it is the director’s cut. I know of the original ending and it sounds weaker by comparison. Although just like Hellraiser this film falls short of greatness, I still think of both films rather highly and I have so far enjoyed Barker as a director. Its worth noting that both Nightbreed and Lord of Illusions were both meant to be franchises, and yet it was Hellraiser that ended up being the series, for better or for worse.

Horrorfest 2015 Presents: Horns (2013, Alexandre Aja)


Imagine you are given the power to know what people are thinking. Sounds great, right? Well there is a catch: you have a pair of horns sticking out of your head, and the Devil has given you power to find out the truth. Someone killed your beloved and this is the only way to figure out the truth and clear your name. This is the basis for Horns, a dark horror comedy from the man who gave us The Hills Have Eyes and Piranha remakes.

Daniel Radcliffe turns in an unexpected and powerful performance as Ig, a man accused of murdering his beloved. The film actually works better as a dark comedy than a horror film, yet it abandons most of the comedic elements midway through. Which is too bad, although the rest of the movie still works. I did like how Ig goes from being innocent to being consumed by revenge, as too many movies skip that aspect.

Overall though I feel a tad unsatisfied. I do want to read the book this film is based off of, and I hope that Radcliffe does more horror movies in the future. He seems to be quite good at starring in them, and I’m glad that he escaped the shadow of the Harry Potter films. Also Juno Temple as Merrin, the dead girlfriend, is lovely beyond belief-no wonder Ig fell in love with her. Aja, the film’s director appears to specialize in gory horror films with a aim towards a 70s style. I like his work so far although I haven’t seen his remake of Wes Craven’s 70s cult classic.

Horrorfest 2015 Presents: Phantom of the Paradise (1974, Brian De Palma)


Why there are not more gothic horror operas in cinema I don’t know. Perhaps it’s due to the few ones being released bombing or not being successful. Phamtom of the Paradise did poorly at the box office, which is a shame considering that it’s wondeful and entertaining. I loved the musical numbers and the film’s cast compliments the proceedings well. Jessica Harper is the standout, although Paul Williams’ wonderfully evil Swan and William Finley as the tragic Winslow/the Phantom also turn in fine performances. I also enjoyed seeing Gerrit Graham as Beef, a 70s style glam rocker who is funny and entertaining. 

Brian De Palma has always utilized different influences, particularly Alfred Hitchcock, although here he channels Orson Welles more. Especially in a great split scene take that reminded me of the classic Touch of Evil. The musical numbers are the film’s strongest aspect, although the best song is saved for the end credits: “The Hell Of It,” a nasty ditty sung by Williams himself. Harper has an equally great number with “Special To Me”-the dance she performs at the end of it is rather amusing. Finley’s “Faust” is strangely beautiful as well; “Dream a bunch of friends,” one of its lyrics, is poetry. 

De Palma manages to create what is possibly the best of the Phantom of the Opera adaptions. While this film is cheesy at times it’s engaging and fantastic,  humorous and creepy. This is the kind of musical that I can endorse, and it is also one of his best films. An overabundance of style and a quality helping of exuberance is never a bad thing, and De Palma’s films always have those aspects in bunches. “Goodbye goodbye goodbye…”

Best of 2014


The list so far:

1. Interstellar (100, Christopher Nolan)
2. The Guest (100, Adam Wingard)
3. Birdman (98, Alejandro González Iñárritu )
4. Whiplash (98, Damien Chazelle)
5. The Grand Budapest Hotel (97, Wes Anderson)
6. Godzilla (97, Gareth Edwards)
7. Only Lovers Left Alive (95, Jim Jarmusch)
8. Selma (95, Ava DuVernay)
9. Blue Ruin (95, Jeremy Saulnier)
10. Cold In July (95, Jim Mickle)

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