Horrorfest 2018 Presents: Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986, Tobe Hooper)


My Halloween night was rather busy for someone who decided to stay in. I watched a couple flicks to start the day, then began drinking around 4 or 5. I spent a couple hours handing out candy to a bunch of trick or treaters until 8:30, while also viewing Hot Fuzz with a friend who had never seen it before. So when I made it upstairs to watch The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2, I was tired and ready to pass out, which I did. Only to wake up at 2 in the morning annoyed and thirsty. I grabbed some brews and put on my copy of Tobe Hooper’s cult classic sequel, which I found on blu ray at Best Buy earlier that month, and hit play.

Although this flick does not live up to the original classic, it is still a fun gory time. Dennis Hopper is an excellent choice as Lefty, the Texas lawman who desires revenge against the infamous Sawyer clan. Aiding him is rock DJ Vanita, played by the awesome Caroline Williams. However Bill Moseley steals the movie as Brick Top, in an equal parts creepy and funny performance. It also helps that Hooper came back to helm this one, as it follows the events of the original a decade later. 

Thus my Horrorfest was concluded with a good solid slasher film, which is fitting considering how much I love the genre at this point. Also all of my four Halloween viewings were physical media ones, in contrast to my usual large use of streaming these days. Check out TCM 2, a late happy Halloween to all, and a see you all for Horrorfest 2019.

Horrorfest 2013 Presents: The Video Dead (1987, Robert Scott)


Released around the same time as Sam Rami’s classic The Evil Dead II, Scott’s The Video Dead is a low budget zombie film in a long line of low budget zombie films. What I dig about his movie is that it’s gory, raw, creepy and entertaining despite its clear limitations and the poor acting. I can admire the level of dedication it takes to get a movie like this made and how hard it was to achieve a pure vision without the proper funds. This is one movie that could have been a classic with just the right budget. Although I guess that never stopped George A. Romero or Sam Rami. Still Scott had an original idea, one that I rather like.

Zombies emerging from a cursed TV set is both fantastic and rather eerie. The hapless brother and sister duo that are faced with an nameless ancient evil must battle the undead horde that is terrorizing their neighborhood. I liked most of the kills, with one murder being properly gruesome. The zombies themselves are decaying and ugly, appearing as if they did truly emerge from their graves to prey upon the living. That’s some quality makeup work for a film that took a year to make due to lack of funding.

The DVD copy I found of this film was a two pack, with The Video Dead being parterned with another solid underrated cult horror film, Terrorvision-thanks to Scream Factory, a division of Shout! Factory. Which is a cool double bill, one I would love to see on the big screen. The Video Dead also has a bone chilling ending and is a reliable addition to the zombie subgenre. I realize it’s funny how every time I think I’m getting tired of zombie films I find another one that surprises me in a good way.

Horrorfest 2013 Presents: Children Shouldn’t Play With Dead Things (1972, Bob Clark)


Now that is a film title. I saw the trailer for this movie on YouTube and I knew I had to watch this movie. And despite being a low-budget movie with the limitations that such films have it’s a really good movie. One that fits in well with other 70s zombie films, containing that sense of doom and being gory and creepy at the same time. Plus it offers a running commentary on show business that is still relevant today.

Alan is an outlandish and semi sadistic film director who attempts a joke that ends up resulting in a cruel punchline. He drags his film making cast and crew to island full of secrets. Naturally the dead come into play and the film by the end embodies its title. Bob Clark was a master of different film styles and with “Children” he gives us an early look into his horror style before making the classic Black Christmas.

This film differs from that one: “Children” contains bleak humor and is at times funny in a wonderfully awful way. There is a weird sense of atmosphere that I really liked and the ending is well…something. Oh and it happens to be rather creepy and quite eerie, although the island location really helps. I miss these kind of horror movies-B films that had a kind of class and energy to them. Too many horror movies lack that nowadays.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑