Horrorfest 2022 Presents: Zombies of Mora Tau (1957, Edward L. Cahn)


Despite wanting to enjoy Zombies of Mora Tau, this whole thing felt as if someone decided to make their own spin on I Walked With a Zombie, only without the style and talent of that movie. Also this is supposed to be set in Africa, yet there is nothing to indicate that is the case. At all. The underwater zombies were indeed neat, yet they don’t have the look of the undead all that much. Plus the movie whimps out by not having the main character be an anti-hero or even a bad guy like he should have been. Weak.

The female characters are decent in this one, yet they are not enough to save the movie which also lacks a real satisfying ending. Still Cahn’s flick does have its moments, primarily one where the film’s ship wreck robbing characters face down a den full of the undead. More of that would have been welcomed in this movie, yet alas it’s a lackluster disappointing effort. The underwater scenes are good however and points and props to this movie featuring zombies emerging from the sea before Carnival of Souls did it 5 years later.

Horrorfest 2018 Presents: Contamination (1980, Luigi Cozzi)


Even though the 1980 cult horror sci-fi movie Contamination has been called a rip off of Alien, I found it to be more of a lost, more gorier episode of Doctor Who. Particularly since the main enemy had been possessed by an alien species, and that aspect usually formed the basis of many a Doctor Who episode. Even though it’s low budget qualities are obvious, I rather enjoyed Contamination. The Italians and the Germans in the 1970s and 1980s made films that were destined to be grind house style classics beloved by those who journeyed to rundown cinemas to view the latest splatter fest. Now a days they are the kind of movie watched by horror fanatics (myself included) online (in this case, Shudder) or via physical media supplied by companies such as Arrow Bay or Shout! Factory.

Once again Ian McCulloch pops up as the sturdy hero, although in this movie he is more a haunted burnt out astronaut recruited by others to stop the invasion of earth by exploding eggs. Louise Monroe and Martin Mase fill out the rest of the cast, and provide the film with a weak love triangle that it jettisons the moment the film needs more violence. Naturally this movie ended up as a video nasty, which embellished its reputation and caused more people to want to see it, not less. Honestly Contamination is nothing more than a fun movie, although perhaps that is enough in this case, and due to changes in cinema and budgets a film like this wouldn’t be made today. The B-movie is dead, long live the B-movie.

Horrorfest 2013 Presents: Children Shouldn’t Play With Dead Things (1972, Bob Clark)


Now that is a film title. I saw the trailer for this movie on YouTube and I knew I had to watch this movie. And despite being a low-budget movie with the limitations that such films have it’s a really good movie. One that fits in well with other 70s zombie films, containing that sense of doom and being gory and creepy at the same time. Plus it offers a running commentary on show business that is still relevant today.

Alan is an outlandish and semi sadistic film director who attempts a joke that ends up resulting in a cruel punchline. He drags his film making cast and crew to island full of secrets. Naturally the dead come into play and the film by the end embodies its title. Bob Clark was a master of different film styles and with “Children” he gives us an early look into his horror style before making the classic Black Christmas.

This film differs from that one: “Children” contains bleak humor and is at times funny in a wonderfully awful way. There is a weird sense of atmosphere that I really liked and the ending is well…something. Oh and it happens to be rather creepy and quite eerie, although the island location really helps. I miss these kind of horror movies-B films that had a kind of class and energy to them. Too many horror movies lack that nowadays.

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